Instruments

Instruments measuring empowering patient education

We have developed structured instruments for measuring empowering patient education, based on the theory of Empowering Patient Education (EPE, Leino-Kilpi & Vuorenheimo 1994, Leino-Kilpi et al. 1998, 1999, Heikkinen et al. 2007, Rankinen et al. 2007, Ryhänen et al. 2012). Instruments have been developed to measure the expected and received knowledge of patients as well as empowering patient education practices in health care. There are several instruments in preparation, e.g., instruments for empowering patient education competence, knowledge test, and for leadership of patient education.

The construction of the instruments is based on the six dimensions of empowering knowledge: bio-physiological (i.e. illness, symptoms, treatment, and complications), functional (i.e. mobility, rest and nutrition), experiential (i.e. emotions and hospital experiences), ethical (i.e. rights, duties and participation in decision-making), social (i.e. families, other patients, and patients unions), financial (i.e. costs and financial benefits). For defining the level of empowerment, the relationship between expectations and received knowledge is fundamental: the closer they are, the higher possibilities the patient has to be empowered.

Instruments

  • Expected Knowledge of Hospital Patients, EKhp
    ©Leino-Kilpi, Salanterä, Hölttä 2003
    Expectations items: 40; Scale: 1=Totally disagree – 4=Totally agree, 0=Not applicable in my case
    Languages: English, Finnish, Greek, Icelandic, Lithuanian, Spanish, Swedish
  • Expected Knowledge of Significant Others, EKso
    ©Leino-Kilpi, Salanterä, Hölttä 2003
    Expectations items: 40; Scale: 1=Totally disagree – 4=Totally agree, 0=Not applicable in my case
    Languages: English, Finnish, Greek, Icelandic, Lithuanian, Spanish, Swedish
  • Received Knowledge of Hospital Patients, RKhp
    ©Leino-Kilpi, Salanterä, Hölttä 2003
    Received items: 40; Scale: 1=Totally disagree – 4=Totally agree, 0=Not applicable in my case
    Languages: English, Finnish, Greek, Icelandic, Lithuanian, Spanish, Swedish
  • Received Knowledge of Significant Others, RKso
    ©Leino-Kilpi, Salanterä, Hölttä 2003
    Received items: 40; Scale: 1=Totally disagree – 4=Totally agree, 0=Not applicable in my case
    Languages: English, Finnish, Greek, Icelandic, Lithuanian, Spanish, Swedish
  • Expected Knowledge of Hospital Patient/Patients with Pacemaker
    ©Leino-Kilpi, Lönnberg, Koivunen 2010
    Language: Finnish
  • Expected Knowledge of Hospital Patient/Ambulatory Surgery Patients
    ©Leino-Kilpi, Salanterä, Leppänen, Lindblom, Nummela 2005
    Language: Finnish
  • Received Knowledge of Hospital Patient/Ambulatory Surgery Patients
    ©Leino-Kilpi, Salanterä, Leppänen, Lindblom, Nummela 2005
    Language: Finnish
  • Knowledge level of Ambulatory Surgery Patients
    ©Leino-Kilpi, Salanterä, Leppänen, Lindblom, Nummela 2005
    Language: Finnish
  • Patient Education of Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease (Patients’ perspective)
    ©Leino-Kilpi, Virtanen, Tuominen, Kilpi, Laulaja, Kiukainen, Karlsson 2016
    Language: Finnish

 

  • NCE Instrument for Evaluating Practice of Patient Education (Nurses’ perspective)
    ®NCE 2001
    Language: Finnish
  • NCE Instrument for Evaluating Practice of Patient Education (Patients’ perspective)
    ®NCE 2001
    Language: Finnish
  • EPNURSE (Instrument to collect information about patient education, nurses’ perspective)
    ©Johansson et al. 2008
    Languages: English, Finnish, Greek, Lithuanian, Spanish

The instruments are available by request from Professor Helena Leino-Kilpi. The use of the instruments for academic research purposes is free. The research plan is required before permission to use the instrument is granted.

If you are interested in using the instruments, please complete the instrument request form and add your research plan. More information about the instruments: Professor Helena Leino-Kilpi, helena.leino-kilpi@utu.fi

Instrument request form

For measuring outcomes of empowering patient education, we have used many other instruments in the field of health-related quality of life (EuroQol Group 1990, QoR-1998), self-efficacy (Pellino et al. 1998), as well as different knowledge and problem-solving tests and instruments for a special educational field.